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Oral Surgery

Bone Grafting


 Bone Grafting

Missing teeth over a period of time can cause your jaw bone to atrophy, or resorb. This often results in poor quality and quantity of bone suitable for the placement of dental implants as well as long term shifting of remaining teeth and changes to facial structure. Most patients, in these situations, are not candidates for dental implants. Fortunately, today we have the ability to grow bone where it is needed. This not only gives us the opportunity to place implants of proper length and width, but it also gives us a chance to restore functionality and aesthetic appearance.

Bone grafting can repair implant sites with inadequate bone structure due to previous extractions, gum disease, or injuries. The bone is either obtained from a tissue bank or your own bone is taken from the jaw, hip or tibia (below the knee). Sinus bone grafts are also performed to replace bone in the posterior upper jaw. In addition, special membranes may be utilized that dissolve under the gum to protect the bone graft, as well as encourage bone regeneration. This is called guided bone regeneration, or guided tissue regeneration.

Jaw Surgery


Corrective Jaw Surgery

Orthognathic surgery is needed when the top and bottom jaws don’t meet correctly and/or teeth don’t adequately fit within the jaw. Teeth are straightened with orthodontics, and corrective jaw surgery repositions a misaligned jaw. This not only improves facial appearance, but also ensures that teeth meet correctly and function properly.

Who needs orthognathic surgery?

People who can benefit from orthognathic surgery include those with an improper bite, or jaws that are positioned incorrectly. Jaw growth is a gradual process and in some instances, the upper and lower jaws may grow at different rates. The result can be a host of problems that may affect chewing function, speech, or long-term oral health and appearance. Injury to the jaw and birth defects can also affect jaw alignment. Orthodontics alone can correct bite problems when only the teeth are involved. Orthognathic surgery may be required for the jaws when repositioning is necessary.

 Jaw Surgery

Oral Surgery/Extractions


 Oral Surgery/Extractions

If a tooth has been broken or damaged by decay, we will first try to fix it with a filling, crown or other treatment. Sometimes, though, there’s too much damage for the tooth to be repaired. In this case, the tooth needs to be extracted. A very loose tooth also will require extraction if it can’t be saved, even with bone replacement surgery (bone graft).

When you talk to an oral surgeon – and anyone on our staff – you’ll find a highly caring and knowledgeable individual who will answer all your questions about tooth extraction services and review the best options for your dental care. So schedule a free consultation today and learn how we can make you smile.

Wisdom Teeth


Third molars, commonly referred to as wisdom teeth, are usually the last four of 32 teeth to erupt (surface) in the mouth, generally making their appearance between the ages of 17 to 25. They are located at the back of the mouth (top and bottom), near the entrance to the throat. The term “wisdom” stems from the idea that the molars surface at a time typically associated with increased maturity or “wisdom”.

In most cases, inadequate space in the mouth does not allow the wisdom teeth to erupt properly and become fully functional. When this happens, the tooth can become impacted (stuck) in an undesirable or potentially harmful position. If left untreated, impacted wisdom teeth can contribute to infection, damage to other teeth, and possibly cysts or tumors.
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Facial Trauma


 Facial Trauma

Our facial trauma professionals are highly skilled in the field of maxillofacial treatment and surgery. They have the training and experience to treat patients that are suffering an injury which needs acute treatment, emergency care and/or reconstruction.

Facial trauma involves, bone fractures, soft tissue injury to the gums and skin or, damage caused to facial nerves, salivary glands or the eyes. Injury can be caused by falling, a road traffic incident, assault, or a sports accident.


Oral Pathology


Oral Pathology, often referred to as Maxillofacial Pathology, deals with the detection, type and management of disease in the mouth. If you visit an Oral Pathologist, he will carry out an investigation into the causes and effects as well as the processes of these types of disease.

When you talk to an oral surgeon – and anyone on our staff – you’ll find a highly caring and knowledgeable individual who will answer all your questions about oral pathology and review the best options for your dental care. So schedule your consultation today and learn how we can make you smile.

 Oral Pathology